Winter 2018 Tai Ji with Zelda – Beginners & Continuing Students Series begin 1/16 & 1/17

Here is your link to register for Winter 2018 Tai Ji with Zelda!

Beginning Tai Ji

Tuesdays Jan 16-Mar 20

4:45-5:45 pm

10-week class

Instruction in first third of Yang style Zheng Manqing short form, with Qigong warm-up.

$150. Registration required after first class. No charge after first class if you decide not to continue.   

Please note: This is not a drop-in class. Instruction is sequential; each class builds on the previous.  Class size 5-10 students.

Tai Ji Energy Explorations

Wednesdays Jan 17-Mar 21

5:15-6:15 pm

10-week series

Open to those familiar with at least the first part of the Zheng Man-qing short form.

Practice of the Yang form with a focus on Peng, Lu, Ji, and An, the four primary energies of Tai Ji. Occasional two-person exercises. Qigong warm-up.

$150. Pre-registration required.

Please note: This is not a drop-in class. Instruction is sequential; each class builds on the previous.  Class size 5-10 students.

Students taking this class may drop in on any Beginning Tai Ji class for free.

Zelda’s Bio:

Zelda began studying the gentle form of exercise, meditation, and martial art known as tai ji quan (or t’ai chi ch’uan), in the 1970s in New York City with Herman Kauz, a martial arts expert who became one of the foremost teachers of Tai Chi in this country. Kauz was an early student of Zheng Manqing, one of the first Chinese masters to introduce Tai Chi to the United States.

After moving to Williamstown, Zelda continued to practice Tai Ji independently and then with instructor Scott Carrino, an advanced student of internationally acclaimed Tai Ji instructor and educator Chungliang Al Huang. Zelda eventually taught in Scott’s place when he went on sabbatical.

Zelda’s classes consist of qi gong exercises followed by instruction in the Yang style Zheng Manqing short form, the most widely practiced form of Tai Ji. She holds a B.A. in Asian Studies from Barnard College, is the author of The Complete Guide to Ethnic New York (St. Martin’s Press), co-author and co-translator of Mao’s Harvest: Voices from China’s Red Guard Generation(Oxford University Press), and worked for many years in public relations and communications.

In recent decades, science has discovered that the slow, flowing movements of the ancient Chinese art of Tai Ji offer a remarkably effective workout for people of all ages. Regular practice has been found to improve balance, coordination, leg strength, cardiovascular endurance, pulse rate, muscular flexibility, immune system response, mental concentration, and cognitive ability.